Welcome to BEYUNIQUE

BEYUNIQUE IS AN ETHOS OF LIFE, FOUNDED BY LUCY YUN IN 2010. IT IS NOT DERIVED FROM BEY-ONCE, BUT IS CREATED FROM LUCY'S LAST NAME, YUN, COMBINED WITH HER MOTTO OF LIFE TO BE UNIQUE.

About

WHAT IS BEYUNIQUE?

BEYUNIQUE is an ethos of life founded by Lucy Yun. Since she was very young, she has been non-stop searching her soul. Her never-ending journeys continued from personality tests to travelling throughout Europe, Asia, Oceania and North America. One thing was very clear- she always yearned to be herself; not to be swayed by mega trends, brainwashed by mass media, or influenced by celebrities. When she moved to Vancouver in 2010, she created BEYUNIQUE, which means to be YUN (herself) and to BE UNIQUE. A decade has flown by, BEYUNIQUE still stands as a place for Lucy's self-expressionism.

Services

What Does She Do?

ART DIRECTION

Delivering a concept-oriented look and feel by building a photo shoot team, providing art and creative direction and set design.

GRAPHIC DESIGN

Specializing in branding, packaging design, stationery design, publication design, web design and UX/UI.

SOCIAL MEDIA CONSULTING

Providing on-brand social media strategies, creating visual contents and managing multiple social media platforms.

BRAND PROMOTION

Generating aesthetically-pleasing visual messages designed to promote brands, goods, ideas and services.

STYLING

Coordinating and balancing the right colours, silhouettes and shapes for person, prop and/or food styling.

PHOTOGRAPHY

Specializing in stylized editorials, conceptualized still life and candid photography that captures the moment.

45256

FOLLOWERS

1973

PICTURES

86812

COMMENTS

394600

LIKES

Clients

ENDORSEMENTS

PACKAGING DESIGN 98%
ART DIRECTION 95%
WEB DESIGN 92%
PHOTOGRAPHY 90%
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Glyn Lewis

Owner, Kent Street Apparel

I hired Lucy to help me build profile for my up-start online apparel company (Kent Street Apparel). Lucy is incredibly talented and hard working. I greatly enjoyed our creative collaboration. Highly recommend!

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Amelie Nguyen

Co-Founder, Anh and Chi

Lucy is fantastic to work with - she is a visionary who is full of creative ideas and a quick mind (and hands) to get the work done in a timely fashion! We loved her so much as our graphic designer on a project that offered her to work work with us in-house as a Creative and Marketing Lead. We would highly recommend Lucy for her gorgeous design sense, efficiency, and professionalism. Did I mention she is super fun and sweet too?! Thank you Lucy for bringing our creative projects to fruition.

Blog

LATEST FROM BEYUNIQUE

[Interview] With Photographer Issha Marie




DESEESION Magazine is a concept magazine I created for art and creative directors, content creators, artisans and artists. It is designed for decision makers who are seeing, interpreting and expressing life and art through their own eyes. Upon conceptualizing the first issue to be still life theme, I interviewed my fellow artist and frequent collaborator, Issha Marie to pick her brain for her tips and struggles as a freelancer photographer. As below, I am sharing the entire interview with some of the photos from our past collaborations. To see the magazine design, click here.





LY (Lucy Yun). Tell us about who you are.


IM (Issha Marie). My name is Issha Marie. I am [currently] a Vancouver-based visual artist, and a fine art and commercial photographer, dealing mostly with food, high concept still life, and some fashion.



LY. As an artist, whose work do you admire?

IM. I look to many, many artists for my influences. My all-time favourite photographer is the late Francesca Woodman, whose movement work and analogue provocative self-portraits still inform much of my visual art practice today. The late Louise Bourgeois is also up there, alongside my favourite contemporary female artists, Cindy Sherman, Suzy Lake, Janine Antoni, Kara Walker, and Carrie Mae Weems. Moreover, I look to the work of Gregory Crewdson for inspiration around cinematic and psychological narratives, Alexey Titarenko and Michael Wesely for their time-based slow-shutter work, and Tim Walker for his whimsy. Many more artists should make this list, but that will probably take a lifetime to list!




From an impromptu collaboration with Issha Marie




LY. What creative projects do you do on your own time?


IM. It’s funny — I’ve shied away from this era for much of my visual arts career, even when I was an art student — but I am now very much exploring the Dutch Renaissance in my work! There is something about the overtly lush and saturated colours of the old-world still life that really speak to me at the moment. The symbolism and the visual metaphors are like cherries on top of a cake for me; the Dutch Masters really played with that, especially in the vanitas paintings. When I was an art student, and up until about a year ago or so, I found this era of art to be quite contrived and stuffy, but I am embracing its traditions and finding ways to decolonize eurocentric art practices to put forward my own voice and my stories as a person of colour exploring her heritage and her family’s past.


LY. Where do you find inspiration from when you create your work?

IM. I have an extensive library of artist mono graphs and niche magazines that I find myself poring over when I am faced with an assignment or a flash of an idea that I am itching to shoot. My physical library is my old-school Pinterest. It is very, very easy to get caught up in the dangerously pervasive nature of the world of social media and the images of today’s contemporary photographers that pepper the stream; people’s work really starts to look similar to one another’s on Instagram feeds. It is very important to take a step back and look at the past for inspiration on how to innovate in today’s market; for me, those years prior to the 2000’s were the golden ages of innovation in visual media. There was no social media - only galleries, publications, television.





Collaboration with Maxime Vialade (Floral Design) & Lucy Yun (Art Direction). Photographed by Issha Marie




LY. What tools do you rely on in your day-to-day work?

IM. Besides my camera and studio lights, my Wextensive collection of props. It drives my partner crazy; I have amassed a vast collection of what looks like trash to everyone else: dried florals, a couple of tumbleweeds, dried seaweed, seashells, rocks, crystals, ceramics, crinkled foils and plastic — anything that sparks my imagination when it comes to adding texture and interesting light to photographs.



LY. What are the most challenging thing you’re facing  as a freelancer?

IM. Honestly, it’s my lack of social media marketing skills and lack of Instagram clout. The freelancer really relies heavily on the look of one’s feeds these days, and the Instagram algorithm that puts the most-liked photos on the top of people’s feeds ensures that photographs from people like me whose number of likes do not compare to those of the giant IG superstars virtually gets unseen. I have to work three times as hard to keep producing content to get those numbers and that level of viewership up, but it’s honestly overkill, and can lead to burnouts in creativity. I find I have to distance myself from that world though, and work on my own pace and just release content when I have content to release.





LY. How do you keep motivated to meet tight deadlines?

IM. Ooooof. Hahahaha! I am the queen of procrastination. I always have been. But if the deadline is really dire, I put on a comfort show in the background and park myself in front of the computer to edit away, sometimes eschewing the need to eat unless my stomach absolutely puts up a fight I cannot ignore [read: angry growling, or when I start to get faint].



LY. Have you experienced a creative block? If so, how did you manage to overcome?

IM. Too many times! Sometimes, all it takes is a lengthy break from creating anything instead of forcing anything out of yourself so that when you do get a flash of inspiration, you are rejuvenated to create again! Do something extremely different from the art of creating. I like to read, immerse myself in a show or a movie, or go out with friends. Oftentimes, when I am itching to shoot but don’t necessarily have the ideas or the creative spark, I go back to the darkroom to print photographs from negatives I already shot, or take out the ol’ analogue camera and shoot a bunch of interesting textures or derelict structures.








LY. Do you have any tips for art students who would want to be a freelance artist/photographer?

IM. Never stop shooting/experimenting. Oftentimes, my ideas come from the odd capture from my iPhone. Go to galleries, see films, read books. Take a break from social media - the world out there is too rich to be consumed by what you see online. You can hone in on a style that is completely your own, but is inspired by what you have taken in beyond the digital world. Be prolific in your craft, but be kind to yourself too. It’s okay to take breaks in creating. We all need our own ways to recharge.



LY. Do you have any tips for art students who would want to be a freelance artist/photographer?

IM. Never stop shooting/experimenting. Often times, my ideas come from the odd capture from my iPhone. Go to galleries, see films, read books. Take a break from social media - the world out there is too rich to be consumed by what you see online. You can hone in on a style that is completely your own, but is inspired by what you have taken in beyond the digital world. Be prolific in your craft, but be kind to yourself too. It’s okay to take breaks in creating. We all need our own ways to recharge.


Contact

Send Lucy an Email

Address

Contact Info

Do you have a project in mind? Email Lucy to book an initial complimentary session with her!

Location:

Vancouver, Canada

Phone:

+604 700 5633

Email:

beyunique @ gmail.com